Reading of the Week: The New Maunder-Hunter Book

From the Editor

Patrick is not participating in physiotherapy, and is thus not eligible for discharge. To the staff on the orthopedics ward at the hospital where I work, that’s a Big Problem.

On Tuesday afternoons, I finish at the Birchmount campus of The Scarborough Hospital and drive to the General, where I see patients on medical and surgical floors. And on a recent Tuesday, I met Patrick.

For the record, Patrick has more than one Big Problem. Patrick smokes and he drinks too much. Patrick has diabetes and lung changes. Patrick is obese. And it’s the combination of all of the above that led to the fall that left him with the fractured hip and the surgery. If Patrick is doing badly – this is his second hospitalization in fifteen months – it’s not for lack of health-care effort. Since his last discharge, he has seen an endocrinologist, his family doctor, and a respirologist. Patrick has home care. Patrick is, in other words, a heavy user of the health-care system. And if we are serious about restraining health costs in light of an aging population, we need to find better ways of dealing with people like Patrick.

This week’s Reading: an excerpt from the new Maunder-Hunter book. In it, the authors forward the following idea: people like Patrick can be better helped if we think about attachment theory.

As you will recall, attachment theory is based on experiments with children exposed to strangers. To summarize (and possibly oversimplify) some very clever experiments: after seeing the stranger, if the child seeks out the parent, and is soothed, it’s considered healthy, or secure attachment, as opposed to insecure attachments, like avoidant attachment and resistant attachment (where the child is less interested in the parent or is difficult to soothe).

This is a terrific and important book – and of interest to all clinicians.

It’s thoughtful and relevant. Do you see patients? You should get this book.

DG

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Reading of the Week: Mental Health — Is There an App For That? & More

From the Editor

Sigmund Freud, Aaron Beck, Steve Jobs?

Do apps have the potential to reshape mental health?

It’s a hot topic and Nature – the prestigious British journal – explores the potential and pitfalls of mental health apps.

In this week’s Reading, we consider “Pocket Psychiatry.”

Also: journalist John Stossel discusses his lung cancer – and health-care delivery.

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Reading of the Week: Thinking Globally and Acting Locally – Scaling Up Depression and Anxiety Treatment

From the Editor

Tim Evans doesn’t mince his words: “The situation with mental health today is like HIV-AIDS two decades ago.”

Tim Evans is a senior director at the World Bank Group. He made these comments after the release of a major new study suggesting that depression and anxiety are undertreated – and costing the world’s economy hundreds of billions of dollars a year.

But this paper has good news: an investment in mental health services will offer a return (counting health benefits) in the range of 3.3 to 5.7.

This week’s Reading: this new paper from The Lancet Psychiatry, and the reaction to it. Note that coverage has included The Guardian and The New York Times (Evans comments are from The New York Times).

I also follow up on last week’s popular Reading on the Goldbloom-Bryden book.

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Reading of the Week: How Can I Help? The Goldbloom-Bryden Book

From the Editor

This week’s Reading: an excerpt from the new Goldbloom-Bryden book.

Get this book. Read it. Share it with your friends.

It’s beautifully written and important.

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Our New Paper: “Making Evidence-Based Psychotherapy More Accessible in Canada”

Happy to see that our paper has just been published (online first) in The Canadian Journal of Psychiatry. And what a great project. My co-author, Dr. David Goldbloom, is a former supervisor from my training, a mentor, and a friend. Back in residency, we talked about a joint project – so glad that, after a few years, it happened.

As usual, I learned much from working with him.

You can find the paper here:

http://cpa.sagepub.com/content/early/2016/04/05/0706743716642416.full.pdf+html

Reading of the Week: Mukherjee’s Essay on Schizophrenia, Genetics, and His Uncle

From the Editor

This is a moving essay about family and loss – and the long shadow of mental illness.

It’s lengthy, but worth the time.

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Reading of the Week: Big Study on a Big Problem: Stigma & Mental Health, and More

From the Editor

Stigma. Suicide prevention.

This week we consider these weighty topics with two excellent papers.

The first, written by Patten et al., looks at the perception of stigma in those receiving mental health care in Canada. The second is a “viewpoint” that asks what we need to do to reduce suicide rates – which, across the West, has not decreased in the past decade.

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Dr. David Goldbloom’s “Walrus Talk” in Calgary: What Will It Take?

Walrus Talk – March 21, 2016

My name is David Goldbloom and I’m a psychiatrist in Toronto at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health and Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Toronto. And I’m here to ask you an important question about mental health in our country: What will it take?

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Our CMAJ Paper

Happy to see our review paper on iCBT has been printed in CMAJ, the country’s oldest medical journal.

And thrilled to see us land the front cover of the 1 March 16 issue.

Reading of the Week: David Cameron’s “Life Chances” Speech, And More

From the Editor

As stigma fades, as mental health problems are recognized and discussed, we have an opportunity to re-think old approaches.

This week, the Readings touch on two large issues: how to handle mental illness in our society, and what to do about addiction and the law. The first comes from a recent speech by the Prime Minister of Britain; the second, from an editorial in The Lancet Psychiatry.

 

Readings have drawn from many sources over these past few years – journals, books, and newspapers. This is the first time we’ve looked to 10 Downing Street for material. But perhaps it wouldn’t be the last time. More and more, people discuss these issues with thoughtful comments; the political class can be counted among them. #Progress

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