MonthMay 2017

Reading of the Week: Effective Therapy for Anxious & Depressed Youth in a Peds Clinic? The New Weersing Study

From the Editor

“Anxiety and depression in youth are widely prevalent, highly impairing, and woefully undertreated.”

So writes San Diego State University’s V. Robin Weersing and her co-authors in a new JAMA Psychiatry paper. In this study, they compare a pediatric clinic-based brief behavioural treatment to referral to outpatient services for depression and anxiety. It’s a novel approach – and one with significant advantages (housing treatment in a primary care setting, to name just one).

So does this work? Spoiler alert: the brief behavioural treatment (BBT) comes out on top.

Anxiety treatment in the peds office: would Norman Rockwell approve?

As an accompanying Editorial notes: “The efficacy of BBT is particularly telling given the low response rate to treatment as usual in the control condition (57% vs 28%), especially for Hispanic populations (76% vs 7%).”

Please note: there will be no Reading next week because of the APA Annual Meeting. (I hope to see you in California.)

DG

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Reading of the Week: Can We Reduce Suicide in the Emergency Department Population? Also, Drugs & Crime

From the Editor

He presents to the Emergency Department a few days after a suicide attempt. What can we do to help keep this man safe today – and moving forward?

Emergency Departments: noisy, busy, and an opportunity for suicide prevention?

It’s a scenario that repeats itself at EDs across the country with regularity. This week, in our first selection, we consider a new JAMA Psychiatry paper that has just been published looking at suicide prevention in the ED population. The authors claim “this study is the largest suicide intervention trial ever conducted in the United States,” and they show that, with an intervention, they can reduce suicides and suicide attempts.

And, in the other selection, we look at a short New York Times essay in which economist Austin Frakt argues that substance programs pay for themselves in crime reduction.

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Reading of the Week: Economics & Mental Health – the New MHCC Paper; Also, Dr. Beck on Marijuana Legalization

From the Editor

Does investing in mental health make economic sense?

We often speak of mental health spending in terms of human terms – that people will have the opportunity to recover. But what about the economics of mental health?

Economics & mental health: worth considering?

This week, we look at a new report from the Mental Health Commission of Canada. In it, the authors consider the impact of mental illness on our society, and then look at options for spending with an eye on economic returns.

In the other selection, we consider marijuana and public health with a blog by Dr. Gail Beck, a psychiatrist affiliated with The Royal. As Ottawa moves towards legalization, she offers a cautionary note: “Most physicians hope that the federal government will approach the legalization of marijuana emphasizing public health concerns as the most important consideration in the drafting of legislation.”

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