TagCarter v. Canada

Reading of the Week: Doctor-Assisted Suicide: The Dutch Experience

From the Editor

Is the practice of psychiatry about to change?

We often think of change in terms of treatment developments – new drugs and therapies. But mental health services are delivered in a larger societal context, and our work is shaped by laws and court rulings. With that in mind, Carter v. Canada has the potential to reshape our work. As you know, last year, the Supreme Court of Canada struck down the provision of the Criminal Code prohibiting doctor-assisted suicide. Later today, a special joint parliamentary committee will issue its report, guiding the drafting of legislation that will legalize doctor-assisted suicide.

How will this future legislation affect those with mental illness? What will it mean for people like us who do clinical work? Obviously, it’s not possible to comment on legislation that hasn’t been drafted yet. But it is possible to look to other countries and consider their experience. In this week’s Reading, Kim et al. consider physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia in the Netherlands. In their study of a country across the ocean, there are lessons for our patients here.

DG Continue reading

Reading of the Week: The New Yorker Essay on De Troyer (and Carter v. Canada)

In her diary, Godelieva De Troyer classified her moods by color. She felt “dark gray” when she made a mistake while sewing or cooking. When her boyfriend talked too much, she moved between “very black” and “black!” She was afflicted with the worst kind of “black spot” when she visited her parents at their farm in northern Belgium. In their presence, she felt aggressive and dangerous. She worried that she had two selves, one “empathetic, charming, sensible” and the other cruel.

She felt “light gray” when she went to the hairdresser or rode her bicycle through the woods in Hasselt, a small city in the Flemish region of Belgium, where she lived. At these moments, she wrote, she tried to remind herself of all the things she could do to feel happy: “demand respect from others”; “be physically attractive”; “take a reserved stance”; “live in harmony with nature.” She imagined a life in which she was intellectually appreciated, socially engaged, fluent in English (she was taking a class), and had a “cleaning lady with whom I get along very well.”

So begins this week’s reading, an essay by writer Rachel Aviv that was just published in The New Yorker.

It’s a moving and tragic story of a woman who struggles with low mood. If she dreams of fluent English and a cleaning lady, her life takes a turn for the worse: after a breakup, she “feels black again.” Loss and estrangement replace hope and love. After years of struggling, the near elderly woman ultimately chooses to end her life. But she doesn’t die by her own hand; she dies in a clinic at the hands of a physician. To us Canadians, this is a story that is both familiar – involving psychiatry and medications – and unfamiliar – euthanasia and state-sanctioned doctor-assisted suicide.

De Troyer’s life and death occurs an ocean away, in Belgium. But, in light of a recent Supreme Court of Canada ruling in Carter v. Canada, a question to ask: how will doctor-assisted suicide reshape psychiatry in this country? Continue reading