Tagcorporate canada

Reading of the Week: ECT in America – Uncommon, Uneven, and Underappreciated? The New Wilkinson Paper; Also, Cope’s Challenge to Corporate Canada

From the Editor

It’s difficult not to be excited about Bell Let’s Talk. Last week’s event set a fundraising record. Pause for a moment and appreciate how far we have traveled: a major Canadian corporation is promoting mental health awareness, raising millions of dollars in the process, and gathering praise from many, including the Prime Minister. The decline of stigma is seen across the west, with talk of tackling the opioid epidemic in New Hampshire, US, and of bettering psychological interventions in Hampshire, UK.

But how accessible is evidence-based care?

In the first selection, we consider a paper just published on ECT in the United States. Drawing on a massive database, the authors of this Psychiatric Services paper find ECT is used rarely and unevenly. In this Reading, we compare the American data to Canada’s – and draw a similar conclusion.

flag_map_of_the_contiguous_united_states_1912-1959A large country with many people – but not much ECT

And speaking of Bell Canada, in our second selection, we consider a Globe article on CEO George Cope’s recent Canada Club speech. In it, Cope challenges other businesses to implement a mental health strategy. “For business leaders… here’s the call-out: The numbers are self-funding. There’s no reason not to adopt a program in your company.”

DG

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Reading of the Week: Starbucks’ Big Mental Health Announcement, and More

From the Editor

Readings in recent weeks have drawn from several journals and a major autobiography.

Recognizing that mental health is increasingly part of our public and private conversations, we draw from newspapers and news sites this week.

image001Starbucks: fraps, breakfast sandwiches, and psychotherapy (for employees)

The decision of Starbucks to expand employee coverage for psychotherapy leads this week’s lineup.

We also consider the first Parliamentary speech of an Australian politician and a new British exhibit of old art – from asylums.

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