Month: July 2024

Reading of the Week: CBT vs Mindfulness for Prolonged Grief Disorder – the New JAMA Psych Study; Also, Wildman on Her Grief, and Clozapine & MedEd

From the Editor

She still wears black. She mourns her partner’s death every day. Despite the passing years, she can’t seem to move forward. DSM-5-TR includes prolonged grief disorder, which has sparked controversy, but it explains well my patient’s complicated bereavement.

What’s evidenced for treatment? Is CBT superior to mindfulness? Richard A. Bryant (of the University of New South Wales) and his co-authors try to address these questions in a new JAMA Psychiatry paper. They describe a randomized clinical trial involving 100 adults offered CBT or mindfulness-based cognitive therapy. “In this study, grief-focused cognitive behavior therapy conferred more benefit for core prolonged grief disorder symptoms and associated problems 6 months after treatment than mindfulness-based cognitive therapy.” We consider the paper and its implications.

In the second selection, Sarah Wildman, a writer and editor, discusses her daughter’s death in an essay for The New York Times. She is candid about her grief. She talks about the passage of time, small things like calendars, and, yes, signs – her daughter promised that if she sees a red fox, it will be her. “I wonder if I should keep every item of clothing I can picture Orli in, I wonder what she would say about each movie I see, each book I read.”

In the third selection, Dr. Theodore R. Zarzar (of the University of North Carolina) emphasizes the importance of clozapine in the treatment of patients with schizophrenia. In his JAMA Psychiatry Viewpoint, he argues for incorporating clozapine proficiency into medical education. “Clozapine initiation can be conceptualized as the community psychiatric equivalent of a procedural skill and deserves the mentorship, knowledge acquisition, and practice that learning a procedure entails.”

DG

Continue reading

Reading of the Week: Psychological Interventions for Schizophrenia – the New Lancet Psych Study; Also, Service Dogs for PTSD, and the Latest in the News

From the Editor

She was distressed by the voices and the paranoid thoughts. Many nights, my patient could barely sleep. She had tried several medications without much improvement. Is there a role for psychological interventions? Would CBT help? What is the evidence for this population?

In the first selection, Nurul Husna Salahuddin (of the Technical University of Munich) and co-authors attempt to answer these questions in a new systematic review and network meta-analysis, just published in Lancet Psychiatry. The analyzed 52 RCTs with 5 034 participants. “We provide robust findings that CBTp can reduce the overall symptoms of patients with treatment-resistant schizophrenia, and therefore clinicians can prioritise this intervention in their clinical practice.” We consider the paper and its clinical implications.

In the second selection from JAMA Network Open, Sarah C. Leighton (of the University of Arizona) and her co-authors describe a study involving service dogs for those with PTSD. In a nonrandomized controlled trial involving 156 military members and veterans, they examined outcomes after three months. “[C]ompared with usual care alone, partnership with a trained psychiatric service dog was associated with lower PTSD symptom severity and higher psychosocial functioning in veterans.”

Finally, we explore the latest news with recent articles from The Guardian, the Ottawa Citizen, and The New York Times. Among the topics: “honest” obituaries and the opioid crisis, antidepressants and withdrawal, and care for pregnant women with substance problems.

DG

Continue reading